#creativeHE is back 22-26 January! All welcome! Please share

GooglePlusLogoA warm invitation to join #creativeHE for 5 days this January! Open to all colleagues and students in HE and the wider public

We can never have enough creativity! We actually need more! Creativity will help us get through the bad times and create good times!

Participate this January from the 22nd to the 26th and explore together fresh, alternative and novel ways to transform learning, teaching and assessment into creative and diverse practice. Let’s make it a bit or a lot more stimulating! We can all do this! Just imagine how our ideas can grow and evolve when we share them and learn together!

#creativeHE is open and free to all. Jump into the Google plus community at https://plus.google.com/communities/110898703741307769041 and/or participate via our hashtag on Twitter. Most of the stuff is asynchronous so there is no excuse not to engage.

This time round Sandra Sinfield of London Metropolitan University, Chrissi Nerantzi of Manchester Metropolitan University and Prof Norman Jackson of Creative Academic are your facilitators and we are sure mentors will emerge from the community.

The plan for Monday until Friday, 22-26 Jan is:
Day 1 Creative induction, introductions: belonging
Day 2 Spicing up learning in the classroom (campus-based, blended and fully online)
Day 3 Extending creative learning outside the classroom
Day 4 Assessment and feedback that works (better)
Day 5 Reflecting on the week and moving forward.

We are of course, as always, very open to your suggestions as well and you will have the opportunity during the 5 days to really engage in what matters to you most.

Check out the Google+ community from Friday 19th January for suggestions on how to get involved and we will make further announcements via Twitter using #creativeHE.

Get Reflective
Why not use a portfolio to capture your learning during the week? You might like to create a beautiful physical journal or sketchbook – or utilise online posts, using Padlet, Pinterest, VoiceThread, WordPress – and share your reflective sketches, drawings or online posts back with us through the #creativeHE G+ community and/or Twitter using the community hashtag #creativeHE.

Each #creativeHE is freshly put together! So if you have been with us before, join us again and share your ideas, practices and dilemmas. Bring your wild imagination along! Surprise us and surprise others. Let’s make magic happen in our classroom!

See you very soon 😉

Sandra, Chrissi and Norman

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Pain, gain – mission

CharlesStephenPeter

The debate around measuring learning gain is gathering momentum internationally, and in the UK context is connected to the Teaching Excellence and Student Outcomes Framework that is applied to higher education institutions to identify them as either bronze, silver or gold providers.  In this special issue of Higher Education Pedagogies, Gossman, Powell and Neame (CELT academics), argue that before we start to apply complicated measurements of learning gain,  we first need to identify the educational purpose of a particular institution as it is this that should determine the nature of the learning to be measured.

Pain, gain – mission

Abstract “We present a short conceptual framework as an opinion piece for considering learning gain based on Biesta’s three domains of educational purpose: qualification, socialisation and subjectification. We invite readers to reflect on the perspectives given in relation to different institutions mission statements around teaching and learning, and consider if the focus on developing methods for measuring learning gain is premature, given the lack of consensus regarding the nature of the learning to be measured.”

If you would like to read this article. Please click on this link

 

 

 

next #creativeHE meetup at Salford Uni on the 19th of January! Will you be there?

#creativeHE is an open collaborative community for creative and innovative practitioners which exists online at https://plus.google.com/communities/110898703741307769041 through which a series of events and courses have been offered by the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in partnership with Creative Academic and facilitators from a range of institutions nationally and internationally.

We will continue connecting, collaborating, experimenting and learning together online this year and have just launched the Creativity in Practice project led by Prof. Norman Jackson.

This academic year, we have introduced meetups in the North-West in collaboration with the University of Salford and the University of Manchester.

Our forth  will take place at the University of Salford on the 19th of January, 12-2pm. and would like to thank Neil Withnell and Emma Gillaspy for organising this. The focus on this meetup is the creative use mindmapping tools and technologies for ideas generation and reflection. Please bring your ideas along to share them with a wider audience. Staff, students and the wider public, all very welcome. For more information and to register, please access  http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/community/creativehe.php We are very much looking forward to seeing you there.

GooglePlusLogoMore info about the #creativeHE initiative:

It aims to support pedagogical rebels and free-thinking innovators in experimenting with, developing, sharing and getting support for novel learning and teaching ideas as well as initiate and disseminate research activity around these that have the power to transform the student and staff experience within and beyond institutional boundaries.

This community is open to anyone who would like to join, academic staff, students and the wider public. All who have an interest in creative and innovative approaches to teaching and helping others learn.

We meet physically on a monthly basis, each time at a different institution. During our meetups, we will have the opportunity to get to know each other, share and grow new ideas, take risks and support each other in our creative adventures, experiment and play, as well as test and develop pedagogical ideas and identify ways to take them forward.

We will continue using the #creativeHE online community space which now supports and connects a global community of over 600 people. Furthermore, this space will offer additional opportunities for professional development through online discussions, events and courses that are organised through #creativeHE, the Creative Academic and the wider academic community. The openly licensed #101creativeideas project will help us collect and share our ideas and the pedagogic innovators project (#pin) to engage in related research activities.

We suggest that each meetup features time for socialising. As the meetups will all be free and open, we encourage each participant to bring a gift of food and/or non-alcoholic drinks to share with other participants. Homemade and more healthy contributions are very welcome as are foods from different cultures. In this simple way we aim to encourage sharing of the many cultures that make up our society.

The institutional contact will coordinate the monthly gathering and a booking system will be in place through CELT at Manchester Metropolitan University. If you would like to become a #creativeHE champion in your institution, please get in touch with us.

We are really looking forward to seeing you again online and locally,

Chrissi and Norman on behalf of the #creativeHE team

GREAT THINGS HAPPEN WHEN PEOPLE COLLABORATE TO LEARN TOGETHER

No 101 #LTHEchat on the 10th of January! Join Prof. Dilly Fung @DevonDilly and all!

The next #LTHEChat Wednesday 10th January 8-9PM (GMT) will be based on questions from Dilly Fung on the dimensions of the “Connected Curriculum” framework. Prof Dilly Fung is Full Professor of Higher Education at UCL (University College London) in the UK. She is also Director of the UCL Arena Centre for Research-based Education, formerly the […]

via #LTHEchat 101 Connected Curriculum with Prof Dilly Fung @DevonDilly — #LTHEchat

Join Dr Cristina Costa @cristinacost this week to discuss digital education #LTHEchat

The next #LTHEChat Wednesday 13th December 8-9PM (GMT) will be based on questions from Cristina Costa on “Digital education: participation as learning” Cristina Costa is a Lecturer in Digital Education and Scholarship in the School of Education, Strathclyde University. Her research focuses on the intersection of education and the participatory web through a sociological lens, especially […]

via #LTHEchat no 99 – “Digital education: participation as learning” with Cristina Costa @cristinacost — #LTHEchat

Insights from literature on lecture capture

downloadPeter McKenna from the faculty of Science and Engineering at Manchester takes a look at the literature…

While students feel that recordings enhance their learning and don’t impact on their attendance, most studies report that there is no significant impact on grades (Kushnir et al. 2011; Leadbeater et al. 2013) and that attendance drops (Traphagen et al, 2009; Marchand et al, 2014; Bos et al, 2015).  The affective value is very strong (in all studies students overwhelmingly value lecture recordings), and this is crucial to relevant KPIs.

However, the flip-side of increased satisfaction is likely to be that students question the point of attending lectures (a perception that already surfaces in survey comments re lecture slide availability). We therefore need to consider how we communicate tensions about non-attendance being a positive part of the flexibility offered by lecture capture (e.g. dispense with the traditional obligation to attend), potential of allowing virtual attendance at live streamed lectures to be factored into attendance data, and any changes (if any) in expectations surrounding physical attendance requirements.

There are conflicting findings on whether lecture recordings could be ‘equivalent’ substitutes for lectures (Traphagan et al. 2010) or not (Williams et al, 2012). However, robustness of experimental design and isolation of other variables are problematic here. Most studies assume a priori the intrinsic importance of using recordings to supplement, rather than replace, live attendance (e.g. Leadbetter et al, 2013; Elliott & Neal, 2016); however, McCredden and Baldock (2009) while acknowledging a significant reduction in attendance, question assumptions around lecture attendance and advocate a ‘more than one pathway’ approach. It seems probable that scaling back attendance rigour is one of the reasons that lecture capture increases student satisfaction, and the importance of physical attendance – as opposed to, say, verified use of recordings – should be examined rather than assumed.

If we continue to require attendance, however, we need to be clear that attending lectures offers significant value over and above watching them. This could mean integrating added-value features into live lectures such as student-student and staff-student interactions. In any case, it will be necessary to clarify how teachers use the facility and how students use recordings; to apply pedagogy rather than merely present passively as a service.

Lecturers

There is a danger that lecture capture could simply reify traditional didactic presentation of information and increase the focus on such formats at the expense of other learning experiences. Leadbeater et al (2013) found evidence that lecture capture might encourage a surface learning attitude.

We need to consider the use of recordings in more communicative and active learning environments. Recorded segments could be actively reused in subsequent contact sessions, to facilitate consolidation and transfer (perhaps a more responsive and dynamic take on the flipped classroom). This could be a particularly valuable activity in response to sections of recorded lectures flagged by students (via Echo360) as hard to understand.

Lecturers can also create short supplementary recorded material for points that were not well understood or that are particularly important. Capture systems such as Echo360 and Panopto can also be used for prepared recordings.

We need more than ever to apply evidence-based principles of multimedia learning theory and research to lectures, and use lecture capture as a positive opportunity to enhance the presentational aspects of the University lecture. For example:

  • Modality: the fact that all verbal information from a lecture will be primarily available in auditory format, should mean that we are freer to move away from text-based screens in our lectures and towards visual presentations and demonstrations. There is robust evidence for the modality principle (Moreno & Mayer, 1999).
  • Segmentation: Lecturers should familiarise themselves with the pause button, and take control of recordings by planning to segment their lectures into small, self-contained and clearly-signalled themes (e.g. producing four 10 minute recordings interspersed with short activities rather than one 50 minute). Recordings per se enable students to fit content better to their attention and concentration spans, but structure and scaffolding add value. There is robust evidence for the segmentation principle (Mayer, 2005).

Students

It is likely that students will expect clear support from teaching staff on the use of lecture recordings. Mather et al (2015) report that 72% of one student cohort felt that a lack of such support had a negative effect on their learning. Students will need to be advised and supported in how they can actively use lecture recordings to support their studies.

Owston et al (2011) found that lower-achieving students use recordings more, later, and more indiscriminately. It has been suggested that they therefore benefit more; but this appears to be speculation rather than a logical conclusion. It is also problematic that a simplistic post-hoc view might suggest a negative correlation between use of recordings and performance. These authors also found that students who view less frequently, achieve significantly higher grades than those who viewed them more frequently. Higher-achieving students used recordings selectively while lower-achieving students repeatedly viewed the whole recording.  Cause and effect should again be questioned with such evidence. The selective use of recordings – including scrub, search and speed variation – would seem to be a sensible strategy as long as there has been a first sitting of the full lecture. Otherwise it would be yet another shortcutting technique.

Recordings are viewed more when assessment points are imminent. We could recommend review within a short time of the actual lecture for consolidation and short-term revision; discriminate use of search; and use of varied playback rates.  Some recommendations will be technology-dependent. When the equipment becomes available in CELT, Stephen Powell will invite the group to explore the specific facilities.

References

Bos, N., Groeneveld, C., van Bruggen, J., & Brand-Gruwel, S. (2015). The use of recorded lectures in education and the impact on lecture attendance and exam performance. British Journal of Educational Technology.

Elliott, Caroline and Neal, David (2016) Evaluating the use of lecture capture using a revealed  preference approach. Active Learning in Higher Education, 17 (2). pp. 153­167. ISSN 1469­7874

Paulo Kushnir, L., Berry, K., Wyman, J., Salajan, F. (2011). Lecture capture: Good student learning or good bedtime story? An interdisciplinary assessment of the use of podcasts in higher education. In T. Bastiaens & M. Ebner (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2011 (pp. 3168–3178).

Leadbeater, W., Shutterworth,T., Couperthwaite , J., & Nightingale, K. (2013). Evaluating the use and impact of lecture recording in undergraduates: Evidence for distinct approaches by different groups of students. Computers & Education, 61, 185–192.

Mather, C., Caesar, L., Chin, C., & Fei, J. (2015). Class attendance and use of Echo360 in Australia: A comparison between undergraduate nursing and maritime disciplines. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 174, 2839–2845.

Mayer, R. E. (2005). The Cambridge handbook of multimedia learning. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Moreno, R., & Mayer, R. E. (1999). Cognitive principles of multimedia learning: The role of modality and contiguity. Journal of Educational Psychology, 91(2), 358-368.

McCredden, JE and Baldock, T. More than one pathway to success: Lecture attendance, Lectopia viewing and exam performance in large Engineering classes [online]. In: 20th Annual Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education, 6-9 December 2009: Engineering the Curriculum. Barton, A.C.T.: Engineers Australia, 2009: 986-991. ISBN: 1876346590.

Owston, R., Lupshenyuk, D., & Wideman, H. (2011). Lecture capture in large undergraduate classes: Student perceptions and academic performance. Internet and Higher Education, 14, 262–268.

Traphagan, T., Kusera, J. V., & Kishi, K. (2010). Impact of class lecture webcasting on attendance and learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58, 19–37.

Williams, A., Birch, E., & Hancock, P. (2012). The impact of online lecture recordings on student performance. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 28, 199–213.

#creativeHE meetup on the 15th of December

Hello everybody,

#creativeHE is an open collaborative community for creative and innovative practitioners which exists online at https://plus.google.com/communities/110898703741307769041 through which a series of events and courses have been offered by the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Manchester Metropolitan University in partnership with Creative Academic and facilitators from a range of institutions nationally and internationally.

We will continue connecting, collaborating, experimenting and learning together online this year and have just launched the Creativity in Practice project led by Prof. Norman Jackson.

This academic year, we have introduced local meetups. Our second one will take place at the Manchester Metropolitan University on the 15th of December, 12-2pm. The focus will be learning through making and particularly through using LEGO(R) SERIOUS PLAY(R). Staff, students and the wider public, all very welcome. For more information and to register, please access  http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/community/creativehe.php We are very much looking forward to seeing you there.

GooglePlusLogoMore info about the #creativeHE initiative:

It aims to support pedagogical rebels and free-thinking innovators in experimenting with, developing, sharing and getting support for novel learning and teaching ideas as well as initiate and disseminate research activity around these that have the power to transform the student and staff experience within and beyond institutional boundaries.

This community is open to anyone who would like to join, academic staff, students and the wider public. All who have an interest in creative and innovative approaches to teaching and helping others learn.

We meet physically on a monthly basis, each time at a different institution. During our meetups, we will have the opportunity to get to know each other, share and grow new ideas, take risks and support each other in our creative adventures, experiment and play, as well as test and develop pedagogical ideas and identify ways to take them forward.

We will continue using the #creativeHE online community space which now supports and connects a global community of over 600 people. Furthermore, this space will offer additional opportunities for professional development through online discussions, events and courses that are organised through #creativeHE, the Creative Academic and the wider academic community. The openly licensed #101creativeideas project will help us collect and share our ideas and the pedagogic innovators project (#pin) to engage in related research activities.

Our monthly local gatherings will be about 2 to 3 hours. We welcome institutions who would like to participate in #creativeHE events by organising a local meetup. All we need is a flexible space for up to 30 individuals.

We suggest that each meetup features time for socialising. As the meetups will all be free and open, we encourage each participant to bring a gift of food and/or non-alcoholic drinks to share with other participants. Homemade and more healthy contributions are very welcome as are foods from different cultures. In this simple way we aim to encourage sharing of the many cultures that make up our society.

The institutional contact will coordinate the monthly gathering and a booking system will be in place through CELT at Manchester Metropolitan University. If you would like to become a #creativeHE champion in your institution, please get in touch with us.

We are really looking forward to seeing you again online and locally,

Chrissi and Norman on behalf of the #creativeHE team

GREAT THINGS HAPPEN WHEN PEOPLE COLLABORATE TO LEARN TOGETHER

UPDATE AFTER MEETUP

Our third meetup took place at Manchester Metropolitan University. We had agreed to explore the use of LEGO(R) SERIOUS PLAY(R) in learning and teaching. So the LEGO suitcase was emptied, well, almost, as we had very keen explorers with us on the day. It was a pre-Christmas meetup and everybody was in a festive mood. We even had Christmas jumpers. What else can we wish for? Again, there was a rally good mix of individuals from all three institutions who seem to find the activities eye-opening and felt that they would like to give it a go. This meetup was organised by a Manchester Met.

#creativeHE meetup No 3 15 Dec 17 Manchester Met