ICED Conference 2016: Purposeful Play workshop followup

This post is intended mainly for those people who attended Claire Hamshire and my pre-conference workshop at ICED 2016. The workshop aim was “To explore the potential of using games and scenarios to provoke and support discussion about quality assurance and quality enhancement”. Thanks to everyone who attended and made it so much fun: we hope you did also achieve the intended learning outcomes, which was “at the end of this session you will be able to use game theory to develop your own simple board games or scenarios to explore potentially challenging topics with staff and students”

To help with this, we have put together some further information about some of the games and activities on this page. Please don’t hesitate to contact either of us to ask questions, tell us how you might use the activities, or propose collaborations.

Claire Hamshire  @clairehamshire

Rachel Forsyth  @rmforsyth

Clinical Reasoning Activities:

Business card suppliers Moo (used for the clinical reasoning activities)

Medical images from the Wellcome Collection (used on the cards) – you need to ask for permission for re-use but it is very likely to be given, in our experience.

Staying the Course

You can find out more about the data used in this game at the Staying the Course website

Accreditation!

You can download the game board and editable versions of the cards, together with some suggested rules, at the JISC DesignStudio site. The game was developed as part of a larger Curriculum Design and Delivery project, partially funded by the UK Joint Information Systems Council. The game pieces were bought very cheaply from eBay. The game is CC licensed and you are free to adapt it with acknowledgement.

Curriculum Planning Cards

These course planning cards can be downloaded in PDF format – they are very simple and the idea could be adapted to use names of activities more commonly in use in your own institution.  There are also ideas for their use on this page.

You can also download additional cards, which we didn’t use in the session, to add a bit more challenge to the planners – to consider how the proposed course might address employability and sustainability issues, or be adapted to be more inclusive. The assessment descriptions can be downloaded in PDF format here. All of these resources are  licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Check my Specs

This game is still under development, but if you email me, I can send you the Game board, as well as the Excel file with the examples in it, which we mail merged into a file to make the stack of cards.

Slides from the session  to download (sorry, large file!)

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Education for Sustainable Development workshops

CELT in collaboration with Special Collections and Science and the Environment  are offering a number of workshops on key themes relating to Education for Sustainable Development. Please click on the link to see the sessions on offer and to book a place http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/cpd/eventsbytopic.php?topic=ESD. They are open to any academic, professional and technical services staff in student facing roles.

For information here is the link to the entire workshop programme, in case other sessions are of interest http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/tale/index.php .

Festival of Social Science event at Manchester Metropolitan University

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‘Deal with each other in the spirit of Ubuntu’

Place: Brooks Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Bonsall Street, Manchester M15 6GX Reception tel: +44 (0) 161 247 2646

Time: 2-5pm

Date: 9th November 2016

This creative programme of activity brings together a world-class social scientist with students from Manchester universities and two community artists. An exhibition, a walking tour, and creation of a collaborative artwork, will help to create a unique experience themed around global citizenship and the idea of ‘community’ that will shine a light on the ways in which social sciences and the creative arts can come together.

This event is completely free and open to all.

Please use the following link to sign up to attend:

http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/cpd/viewcourse.php?unit_id=234

 

Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti: Canada Research Chair in Race, Inequalities and Global Change, at the Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

Vanessa has extensive experience working across sectors internationally in areas of education related to international development, global citizenship, indigeneity and social accountability.  Her work combines poststructuralist and postcolonial concerns in examining educational discourses and designing viable pedagogical pathways to address problematic patterns of international engagements, flows and representations of inequality and difference in education. Many of her publications are available at: https://ubc.academia.edu/VanessadeOliveiraAndreotti.

Kerry Morrison – Environment Artist and In-Situ Director

Kerry Morrison merges art with ecology to produce intriguing interventions in the everyday landscape of our urban lives. Through a conspicuous process of walking, talking, listening, drawing, collecting, and performance, she explores people’s connections with the environment: how we move through it, take from it, and add to it. Her approach is durational and transitory whereby art is a verb: a process of action, dialogue, and performative patterns resulting in new, shared experiences and unfolding narratives. She co-founded InSitu, a not-for-profit artist-led organization based in Pendle, East Lancashire. In Situ nurtures into existence art that addresses local issues with the aim to make a positive difference to people’s lives and the environment.

Mary Courtney – visual artist and poet

“I like to experiment with drawing and different visual art forms, to play with words and ideas and bring out creativity in others”.

Mary has been artist in residence at Warwick University Chemistry Department during 2016, leading art workshops for staff and students and scripting and producing a chem-art film called “Planet Biscuit: Into the Micronosphere”. She’s organised giant community map-making events, with hundreds of participants, including the “Mappa Magnificellaneous” this year. Art-poetry combinations have been exhibited at Compton Verney, Tate Modern and MediaCityUK. She has received poetry awards from the National Poetry Competition, the International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine and Cambridge University.

 

For more details contact:

Alicia Prowse at Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, Manchester Metropolitan University, a.prowse@mmu.ac.uk

Valeria Vargas at Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, v.vargas@mmu.ac.uk

Susan Brown, School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester, Susan.A.Brown@manchester.ac.uk

Play for Learning at MMU > invite to contribute

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image source here

Dear colleagues,

Playful teaching practices have started spreading at MMU and it is very refreshing.

We would like to collect your stories and make them available in a special issue of Learning and Teaching in Action to spread your playful learning and teaching interventions with further colleagues across our institution and further afield.

Each story should be about 1000 to 1500 words and include visuals to bring your story alive. Please adapt the template to capture your story and submit it by the 1 May using the submission form.

Consider also using your playful story towards 15 or 30 FLEX credits. You will also be invited to share your story in a Play cafe during the Learning and Teaching Festival during June 16.

Please email any questions and/or your contribution to Dr Stephen Powell at Stephen.powell@mmu.ac.uk

Thank you for considering this opportunity.

Chrissi (@chrissinerantzi) and Stephen (@stephenp)

 


Case study template

Title
Author
Email
Twitter

Provide a brief overview / context

What did you do and why?

What did your students do?

How did it work for you and your students? How do you know?

What did you learn and what will you do next?

What are your top 10 tips for others who would like to adopt more playful learning approaches in their practice?